Smoking Could Severely Affect Your Bitter-Taste Sense

| April 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

Our gustatory sense is an essential part of our being since it allows us to accurately distinguish the tastes of a given food that we eat everyday. But, what if you happen to be a chain smoker and eventually your irrational smoking habit will soon have its lethal effects on your very sacred temple? According to researchers in France, both present and former smokers alike will soon be finding them-selves in extremely difficult situations to correctly differentiate a bitter-tasting food from what is not; because of their direct exposure to those lethal chemicals which are inherently found in cigarettes. However, these French scientists have failed to establish a direct cause and effect relationship of this new scientific development. To begin with, they had used about 450 participants in the said experiment. Of course, these subjects had been requested to taste some food that are bitter, sweet, sour and salty. In addition, the main objective of this research is to accurately gauge the intensity of these tastes in particular.

Smoking is really dangerous to one's health, because it severely affects a person's gustatory sense.

Smoking is really dangerous to one’s health, because it severely affects a person’s gustatory sense.

To accurately establish the above mentioned theory, the brilliant scientists have equally divided the participants into three major groups namely: Smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers. As far as their major findings are concerned, here are some of them. First, it has been concluded that this kind of vice has no direct effect on the amazing ability of the tongue to detect the following kinds of tastes: The sweet, sour and salty. On the other hand, when it comes to bitter food the tongue’s bitter receptors were able to detect it although it was seemingly at low concentrations only. Likewise, it was found out that almost 1 out of five participants was significantly found out to have experienced some kind of difficulty in correctly identifying the taste of caffeine. This was objectively compared to about one-quarter of former smokers and 13 percent of nonsmokers respectively. This was in accordance to a study that was published via the power and versatility of cyberspace sometime in March. The title of the medical journal is Chemosensory Perception.

Generally, when a person smokes a build up from these harmful substances of tobacco might in one way or the other impede the regeneration of his or her taste buds. Therefore, it greatly minimizes the ability of a smoker to determine some kinds of tastes even though quite a number of them had already decided to kick off the habit for good. This was based on another research study that was conducted by Nelly Jacob and her compatriots from Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital in Paris. To make their conclusive findings more concrete and verifiable, here’s what she said.

We consider that the perception of bitter taste should be examined more closely, both as a tool for smoking cessation or for preventing smoking initiation. More generally, it would be worthwhile to consider the role of chemosensory perceptions in smoking behavior.

Smoking is really bad for our health and awesome physiological constitution. Hoping that someday, there would be an excellent and a more viable alternative to this very dangerous habit of millions, the world over.

Category: Health

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